TED Ideas :- Why Work Does not happens at Work

7 Dec

HR Article :- 9 Qualities that will Rock your career

7 Dec

Qualities of the employeeSuccess in life is always relative. Some people are happy with small achievements while there are others who won’t be satisfied until mountains are moved.

Regardless of our ambitions, our career spans through a series of jobs and experiences that truly polish our personality and will. While we all have defining moments that will determine our core beliefs around hard work, persistence, determination, etc., these are all simply components of a greater foundation that defines ‘you’. A rocking rise through corporate ranks involves a radical understanding and possible change in your attitude and behaviors.

There are millions of brilliant people who pursue aggressive career paths and have their sights set on great achievement. While their ability is nothing short of genius, many lack the soft skills that could put them over the top. These are the traits, qualities and understandings are what make good people great. Practical and time tested, mastering and practicing the following qualities will make if difficult for success to elude you.

  1. Out of Box Thinking
    Many dislike this term but the concept is for real. All it requires is thinking of problems though a different set of eyes, or different dimension. This is why many brainstorming sessions fail; most people sit and think of work problems in the context of what it means to the company, not the user, not the environment, etc. Sit back and try to solve the problem from the eyes of a 6 year old, turn things upside down, and absolutely challenge the norm. Go outside and sit in a subway station (or somewhere you generally don’t sit to work) and think about why other solutions not worked? What has worked?

    Remember the best ideas come from people who are hands-on with their work. When everyone thinks and recommends a lackluster way, lackluster results will follow. Change your surroundings, change your views, change your thought process and come up with a killer idea!

  2. Taking Ownership
    When no one is willing to own it, be the first to grab the opportunity. A process involving various stakeholders normally loses vision and momentum. A process with a good leader, input from others, and true direction, has a much better chance of success. Be the person that jumps in and takes on a new project (just don’t over-commit). An ability to own and work towards success is a skill which gives long lasting returns.
  3. Eagerness to Learn
    After a certain period, a job becomes monotonous and people become bored and eventually even lazy. They lose all the zeal to learn new things and although they won’t admit this, their actions would make you believe they have thrown in the towel and are satisfied with a status quo life and career. If you really want to move ahead, don’t get into this rut. Don’t tune out.

    Always remain eager to learn; you never know what knowledge or capability will push you up in your career. Remember, you need an open mindset and positive attitude to approach work. If you are constantly learning, it will be tough to be or appear to be interested in mediocrity.

  4. An Eye for Detail
    If you are hands on with your work there is no reason why you won’t know the intricacies involved. Therefore, have the confidence needed to make difficult choices. When you master something and know the minute details, your logic and ideas will be highly regarded. While people love to argue, they get easily impressed by intelligent reasoning too.
  5. Willingness to Help
    Much of life is give and take. Work is no exception. If you are the person that is constantly stepping out of your comfort zone in order to help others, people (most) will return the favor when you ask. That’s the key though, you have to be willing to help someone and not too proud to ask them for help when you need it.
  6. Networking
    Your network should never be restricted to people in your domain but it should span other departments too. Again, break away from comfort and get engaged with someone from a different department. When you sell yourself in the market, you need people who can vouch for you and the broader the network, the better. A strong network always gives you an upper hand, not only to receive but also influence the information flow.
  7. Solution Seeking Mindset
    People love to mention and talk about problems. However, when you ask for their solutions to those problems, they aren’t willing to go on record with sweeping changes. The majority of employees lack an attitude to solve issues and love to keep them burning for long time, almost to encourage sympathy. It is these times that a positive mindset can send the right vibes across and can really give you a lot of attention. Don’t avoid complainers, listen to them just long enough to hear the problem, then try to come up with a solution.
  8. Humility
    Arrogance has its own advantages but it never attracts more people than the magic done by humility. When you know your work and are humble about it than there is no reason that you would not get the desired appreciation. Humility needs to be pitched with much care lest it lets people take undue advantage of you. Strike the right balance and you would see its real magic.
  9. Being Practical
    Human beings are emotional and many fall for popular decisions. A practical decision made at right time with right attitude has the ability to shower you with long lasting fame. Remember, the people who are at the top are nothing but practical.

It is a jungle out there where you not only need to survive but flourish too. Develop the killer attitude for success and no one would ever dare to stop you.

Always

  1. Work Hard, Work Smart
  2. Make sure the world knows about it
  3. Make sure to sell it in right manner to right people

Go, Get Success

 

Regards,

Pinal Mehta

HR Stories :- Test of Communications Skills

3 Dec

It was a hot meeting at the office conference hall. All the people from the department had been called. The VP was looking much tensed.
 

The mood was so bad. My friend asked me – “Hey, what is this meeting all about? I told – May be they will decide on when to have the next meeting.

People around smiled at each other. Then the VP started talking. It was about the recent attrition rate that was so high. Around 10 people had put in their papers. All experienced guys. It was quarter end and so work was huge. If we do not complete the work on time, we need to be paying heavy penalty said the VP.

The VP turned to the manager and told “Hey – take how much ever resources you want. Recruit or take them from other departments. But complete the work in another 25 days. Take people and complete it man.

 
To this the sweet manager replied “Sir! Give me one wife and nine months and I shall show you results. Don’t give me nine wives and one month. I cannot do anything.” Everyone looked at him blank.

 
The VP was not prepared for this answer. We looked at the manager and thought “What an Awesome Reply man!”

HR Article :- Promotion can be a double-edged sword

3 Dec

WINNING WAYS IN MANAGEMENT

Question:

My problem may not seem like a problem to you, but it has me completely panicked.  My last project was considered ”huge” success, and as a result, I was promoted up three rungs to run department.  I don’t have the experience or the knowledge to do this job.  What should I do ? –Anonymous, Hartford, Connecticut

 

Answer:

Congratulations.

You’ve stumbled upon one of the best-kept secrets about work.

Getting promoted is a double-edged sword:

Thrilling, yes, but terrifying too. Everyone is calling you with hearty congratulations and slapping your back, saying you deserve it, and you’re smiling away for them all, feeling a lot less jovial than you look.

It doesn’t matter if it’s your first managerial stint or you move into the CEO’s office.

You are the only on e who truly comprehends how little you know about the new job, especially when compared to the big, bold expectations your bosses keep mentioning.

Whatever happened, you want to scream, to the perfectly logical idea of a grace period?

It’s best not to scream, of course.

After all, you’ve been told that leaders need to appear clam and in control, and that’s true.

Leaders should look and act like leaders for the sake of their people’s respect and confidence and the organization’s forward momentum.

But being a leader doesn’t mean you can’t ask questions: Good leaders are, by definition, insatiable learners, relentlessly probing the mind of people at every level for ideas and insights.

They are voracious relationship builders too, and make sure they get to know everyone in the business who can open their eyes to the who, what and when of the job.

Obviously, you don’t ever want to seem clueless, and we can’t imagine you would, given your past success.

You want to appear deeply inquisitive about every aspect of your business and passionate about helping your people to achieve everything necessary to win.

Those traits won’t undermine your authority.

They’ll enlarge it.

Are we asking you to fake it? No. we’re asking you to reinvent your self-perception according to reality.

Right now, you’re experiencing the same feelings that most new leaders do.

Do you think that a president feels any different when he’s made the leap from say, running a little southern state to having his finger on the nuclear trigger? Being in charge of something new starts the game all over again, no matter what you’ve done before.

You dub yourself “not ready.”

We’re saying that you should dub yourself “normal.”

And you will eventually learn what you need to know to do your new job.

Six months or a year from now, there will even be days when you feel on top of it all.

But business today changes too fast and has too many variables for any manager to ever have the sustained sense of security you yearn for.

Indeed, part of being a leader circa 2007 is being able to live with an “uh-oh” feeling in your stomach all the time.

Don’t let that panic you more! Instead, consider the proposition that continually feeling a bit overwhelmed and under informed is a positive thing for both you and your business.

Everyone knows that too much confidence can lead to arrogance and inertia based on “that’s how we do it around here.” The flip side is an insatiable hunger for new ideas and better ways of doing things – a hunger that makes you fight like hell to win.

Archived from ‘The New York Times News Service

Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

HR Articles :- Top Signs Your Employees Are Not Engaged

3 Dec

A tongue-in-cheek look at some signs that employees are not engaged, followed by proven action plans to improve that situation.
 
For decades, studies have shown that employee engagement has a direct influence on a company’s financial performance, its capacity to recruit other high performers and its ability to retain top talent.
 
To put a slightly off-kilter spin on employee engagement, here’s a list of signs your employees are not engaged, followed by an action plan that companies can implement to improve employee engagement within their organization.
 
Signs to be on the look-out for are:
 
1. Your employees are more satisfied with new episodes of MTV’s Jersey Shore than company benefits.
 
Action Plan:
Use an employee e-newsletter to regularly educate employees about their healthcare, vision and dental benefits, highlighting specific updates and special perks.
 
2. Your employees never show up to work on time yet always arrive at company parties 15 minutes early.
 
Action Plan:
Hold a time-management training seminar, teaching employees how to better manage their time and priorities.
 
3. Your employees are more interested in using Groupon to save them money than finding innovative ways to save the company money.
 
Action Plan:
Reward employees who come up with cost-saving ideas that will benefit the company’s bottom-line.
 
4. Your employees spend more time talking to their co-workers about their crazy weekend than completing important projects.
 
Action Plan:
Have teams establish ground rules for working together. Post them in a public place and encourage all team members to hold each other accountable to the new rules.
 
5. Your employees trust politicians more than they trust senior management.
 
Action Plan:
Make senior management more available and visible to employees to build trust.
 
6. Your employees remember their sister’s husband’s brother’s birthday but forget how to complete easy, painless work-related tasks.
 
Action Plan:
Ensure employees are aware of all the tools, software and equipment available to them and provide training to make sure employees understand how to use them to their full potential.
 
7. Your employees would rather voice their displeasure with their jobs on “www.ihatemyjob.com” than with their supervisors.
 
Action Plan:
Develop “office hours” for employees to openly voice their opinions and give suggestions to their supervisors.
 
8. Your employees call in sick on the same day and time every week.
 
Action Plan:
Institute an incentive policy where employees who accumulate a set number of unused sick days can earn an additional vacation day.
 
9. Your employees build origami out of important project materials instead of reading them.
 
Action Plan:
Hold monthly brainstorming meetings to allow employees’ creative sides to come out, generating new, innovative ideas for upcoming projects.
 
10. Your employees believe the odds of their favorite NFL team winning Super Bowl are better than the odds of their supervisor offering them a job promotion.
 
Action Plan:
Conduct one-on-one meetings with employees to discuss career growth and opportunities for advancement.
 
These signs and others like them require immediate action by management to prevent against continued disengagement.
 
By establishing a sound employee-engagement strategy and executing the aforementioned action plans, organizations will be well on their way toward improving their employees’ engagement levels, and, more importantly, retaining their top talent as the economy recovers.
 
 
[About the Author: Kevin A. Sheridan is CEO/Chief Consultant at HR Solutions.]

Regards,

Pinal Mehta

HR News :- For Social Cause…!!!!!!!!!!!

3 Dec

Frustrated with autorickshaw drivers who would refuse to ferry short distances, three cycling enthusiasts came up with an innovative, yet efficient, project: Cycle Chalao.

People can hire bicycles for short distances from prime locations such as railway stations, colleges and malls for as little as Rs 10 a day. The cycle-for-hire service is currently available at Mulund railway station and nearby Kelkar College and is limited to students because of identification problems. Twenty-four-year-olds Raj Janagam, Jui Gangan and Jyotika Bhatia, the core members of the seven-member team, had launched the project on January 26. They are all pursuing Executive MBA in Social Entrepreneurship from NMIMS in Vile Parle.After registration, one can hire a bicycle from one station and drop it at another for Rs 175 a month or Rs 45 a week.

Cycling in Mulund has become a trend with Cycle Chalao,” said Swejal Gangan, who has been hiring cycles to travel short distances for the last six months.

Cycling every morning is very refreshing and healthy. Sometimes, we friends go for pleasure rides.”The group plans to set up four more “bicycle stations” by January. “We also plan to issue smart cards, similar to the ones used in public transport buses, so that everyone can use the service on showing an identification proof,” said Janagam.

“We are now facing problems in generating revenue and also getting permissions to set up more bicycle stations because these do not come under the purview of the Regional Transport Office (RTO). We try to recover revenue from advertising space above the wheel,” said Jui.The Centre for Sustainable Transport, a non-profit organization, is also working towards promote cycling to prevent pollution and tide over traffic problems. “We are in touch with the municipal corporation to create a dedicated cell for bicycles because of the RTO norms,” said Rishi Aggarwal, director, Institutional Relations, CST

HR CaseStudy:- When Grapevines are Good (Gossip’s @ Workplaces)

3 Dec

Gossip, just like social media, is an exchange of information between two or more people typically about a third, absent party. Managers may view their lack of control in such a democratic environment as a threat. Instead, they should look at the positive powers of gossip as a tool to diagnose or influence workforce issues.
 
Call it whatever you like, the grapevine, water cooler, gossip or the rumor mill. Conversations among co-workers happen. As human beings, we are social creatures who crave community, engagement and interaction.
 
Whether it’s talking shop about the boss, layoff rumors after a less-than-satisfying quarterly earnings report or gossip about Susie in Accounting and her supposed office extra-curriculars, conversations among co-workers are a guarantee.
 
Management has battled with gossip and the grapevine since the beginning of time. Supervisors are quick to lay blame to wildfire rumors, half truths and innuendos at the office as being detrimental to workplace productivity and undermining management authority. However, a recent study by two doctoral candidates at the University of Kentucky sheds some light on the positive power of gossip in the workplace.
 
Some Points to Ponder:
 
1. Gossip improves an employee’s social understanding of his or her environment.
This concept is the basis of cultural anthropology and the concept of micro-cultures. Workplace cultures are no different.
 
2. Gossip is natural.
According to the University of Kentucky study, 96 percent of employees admit to engaging in gossip at work.
 
3. It’s not all negative.
Nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of gossip was an even blend of both positive and negative. Only 7 percent of gossip was largely negative.
 
4. Negative gossip
Negative gossip is a symptom of a larger organizational problem.
Just like a fever or runny nose alerts an individual to an infection, negative gossip is no different.
 
5. Perception is Reality.
Prior to the written word, the grapevine was a form of historical storytelling and news distribution. Sometimes, the spoken word is more reliable than the written word in the workplace. Visit any break room or smoking section as a covert HR operation and you’ll see exactly what I mean.
 
Just as social media is about engagement and influence outside of a brand’s scope of control, so, too, is the workplace grapevine outside of a manager’s control. Gossip, just like social media, is an exchange of information between two or more people typically about a third, absent party.
 
And managers view their lack of control and that democratic environment as a threat, instead of a tool or channel in which to diagnose or influence a situation or scenario. There is no silver bullet to managing gossip in the workplace or via the Internet. One size does not fit all, but here is some food for thought:
 
1. Conversations require at least two people.
Managers should be talking to their teams just as companies should be talking to their customers. After all, employees are our biggest asset and advocate for our companies and brands.
 
2. Don’t bribe or threaten the workforce.
Just as in branding, you must be authentic. People are smart, cynical and suspicious. Have conversations, mean what you say and keep your promises.
 
3. Don’t be afraid of the negative.
Hearing negative feedback about our style as a manager is hard, but if we fail to listen to our audience (our consumers), we risk feeding the best.
 
With the Internet, nothing is secure. Your team is not only gossiping at work but also on social-media platforms and forums, not just Facebook. Glassdoor.com and forums on Indeed.com are common sites where employees go to let off steam squarely within the public eye and with open access.
 
4. Survey the troops.
If you don’t already, facilitate an employee-engagement survey. Use tools such as exit interviews and other employee surveys for feedback. It doesn’t have to cost anything; they can be created for free by using online tools such as Survey Monkey.
 
For thousands of years, the workplace grapevine has been a social and cultural case study in action. Rumor mills, shared assumptions and opinions have long been a part of what makes our place of work interesting, enjoyable, intolerable or entertaining.
 
Social-media experts are quick to segment the social audience when working on marketing or public-relations campaigns. Managers and human resource professionals should do the same.
 
In Groundswell, authors Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff identify six groups who can be found in social media. While these profiles were created for social-media purposes, I believe they can be used in a workplace context.
 
The profiles can help identify the different types of workplace influencers and their involvement in what makes the community flow and how thoughts and ideas are influenced.
 
a) Creators.
These individuals are extremely socially active and are enthusiastic about their hobbies, passions, dislikes or love of a product, brand, company or service.
 
They are connected and have an established and strong community, and are seen as an authority because of their extensive research and ability to vet information to others.
 
b) Critics.
These individuals are extremely vocal and use either online or word-of-mouth to rate and critique products and services.
 
These individuals can be your best allies, especially if you have a great customer-service department, stellar management team or new program you are rolling out to the staff. Don’t be misled by word “critic” as having a negative connotation. These team members can be an evangelist for your organization and culture.
 
c) Collectors.
These individuals have a great deal of influence and can generate a great deal of chatter in a short amount of time because of their extensive network and passion for sharing information.
 
These team members focus on collecting information and content for sharing with other members of their active community.
 
d) Joiners.
These individuals want to feel like they belong to something. If online, they are very active on community sites like Facebook and are extremely engaged in places that involve a sense of community such as churches and professional organizations.
 
Their ability to connect with many individuals and persons is a draw for team members. They often join for the sake of joining — to belong.
 
e) Spectators.
These individuals love to sit back, watch and enjoy taking in the environment and situation to soak up all information.
 
Online, these individuals are focused on using ratings and reviews to draw conclusions. Don’t be surprised if they use these same methods of surveying and gathering data when engaging and influencing your organization.
 
f) Inactives.
These are those individuals who are present and listening but not participating and engaging. They have one ear to the wall but have not made an effort to actively participate within the organization or culture. Just as they would do online.
 
 
[About the Author: Jessica Miller-Merrell, SPHR, is an author, speaker and consultant. She is a leader in the HR social-media community and her book, Tweet This! Twitter for Business, was released in February. Her company, Xceptional HR provides businesses with social-media and recruitment strategies, and human resources consulting.]